Research

My research primarily focuses on how misperceptions of inequality shape people’s preferences for redistribution and the impact of tax and transfer policies in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

Selected working papers related to inequality

Why are relatively poor people not more supportive of redistribution? Evidence from a Randomized Survey Experiment across 10 countries (Revise and Resubmit at the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy – SJR 8.473) [Available here]

A False Divide? Correcting Beliefs about Inequality Aligns Preferences for Redistribution Between Right- and Left-Wing Voters (with reviewers at the Journal of the European Economic Association – SJR 7.832) [Available here]

American Exceptionalism? Differences in the Elasticity of Preferences for Redistribution between the United States and Western Europe (with reviewers at the Economic Journal – SJR 5.453) [Available here]

How does Information about Inequality Shape Voting Intentions and Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from a Randomized Survey Experiment in Indonesia (with reviewers at the Journal of Development Economics – SJR 3.432) [Available here]

Selected working papers related to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific

Increasing Tax Compliance Without Increasing Revenue: Evidence from Population-Wide Randomized Control Trials in Papua New Guinea [Available here]

Taking Financial Access to Remote and Insecure Areas: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial of a Comprehensive Financial Inclusion Program in Papua New Guinea [Available here]

The Marginal Benefit of an Active Labor Market Program Relative to a Public Works Program: Evidence from Papua New Guinea [Available here]