Research

My research primarily focuses on how misperceptions of inequality shape people’s preferences for redistribution and the impact of tax and transfer policies in Papua New Guinea and the Pacific.

Selected working papers related to inequality

Why are relatively poor people not more supportive of redistribution? Evidence from a Randomized Survey Experiment across 10 countries (Revise and Resubmit at the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy – SJR 8.473) [Available here]

American Exceptionalism? Differences in the Elasticity of Preferences for Redistribution between the United States and Western Europe (with reviewers at the Review of Economics and Statistics – SJR 8.363) [Available here]

How does Information about Inequality Shape Voting Intentions and Preferences for Redistribution? Evidence from a Randomized Survey Experiment in Indonesia (with reviewers at the Journal of Development Economics – SJR 3.432) [Available here]

Selected working papers related to Papua New Guinea and the Pacific

Boosting Tax Compliance in a Fragile State: Evidence from Population-Wide Randomized Control Trials in Papua New Guinea (draft paper available on request)

Taking Financial Access to Remote and Insecure Areas: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial of a Comprehensive Financial Inclusion Program in Papua New Guinea (draft paper available on request)

The Impact of a Secured Transaction Framework on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial in Fiji (in progress)